Wednesday, 7 August 2013

CONTEMPLATION ACEO - TAKE A STEP BACK - LEARNING TO EVALUATE

SCAN OF PAINTING
CONTEMPLATION
ORIGINAL ACEO BY SEA DEAN
3.5" x 2.5"

This original painting is SOLD but I'm happy to take a commission for a similar original work of any size. Contact me to inquire about prints and Art cards.
To view my Gallery please visit Daily Paintworks. You may also view ALL my available ACEO in my Facebook Gallery here.


PHOTO OF PAINTING UNDER HALOGEN
PHOTO OF PAINTING IN NATURAL MORNING LIGHT




























When I finished this painting last night it was after midnight and photographing at that time of day is challenging. The photo above was taken under halogen light. This morning I completed a scan which shows the colour more accurately, although some of the warmth is missing.

This was another painting taken from Leslie Saeta's trip to Italy. It was a collection of women, but I chose to depict only one. She reminded me of a native American possibly from the Navaho tribe, and as I love that part of the world I was really drawn to paint her. I wanted to keep the background neutral and had the hardest time stopping myself from filling the space. :o)

TAKE A STEP BACK

Learning how to evaluate your own work is a crucial step in the painting process. This is also important information for the Art purchaser. There are several things you can do which allow you to gain perspective when you're painting.

1. The most important is stepping back from your work. Stepping back allows you to see the painting from the angle of a buyer and it's surprising how different things look.

2. Squint. Squinting allows you to see the major parts without interference of detail. It shows up values, rather than colour, composition, white space, leading lines and common errors like things being too close to the edge.

3. Hold your painting up to a mirror. - Wow! This allows another perspective and often shows up major problems.

4. Turn your painting upside down or on it's side.

5. Photograph the work and look at it in the thumbnail version. A great painting will look great no matter what size you view it in. This technique often shows up lack of variety in value and as the internet is a common way for buyers to shop, it shows their first impression of a painting.

6. Convert your photograph to black and white to get a really good look at the values and composition without being swayed by colour.

Did I miss anything which you find valuable? 


Cat 13193 - Contemplation